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20121213
20121213
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
of america shared in that growth. by making education affordable, by fostering innovation and job creation, and providing economic security to retirees through medicare and social security, our country went from a paralyzing great depression to an economic superpower. we were able to accomplish such a drastic transformation because we were willing to consider revenue as a way to invest in the future, as a way to promise security to our seniors -- economic security to our seniors. focusing spending on policies that work and balancing revenue is at the core of this debate. i've made tough choices in the 1990's that balance the budget, generated a surplus and supported robust job creation. in january of 1993, unemployment stood at 7.3%. in january 2001, that rate had been reduced to 3.9%. that period of record growth also saw an important decline in the poverty rate. in 1993, 15.1% of americans were in poverty. but thanks to job growth and an expanding economy, based upon a balanced approach to deficit reduction, including revenue and targeted reduction in expenditures, poverty fell to 11.3%
the dialogue as ago for to create jobs, innovation and america across all the spectrum. thank you. the committee now stands in adjourned. [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> you are watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs, we case featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy vince. every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> the u.s. senate is about to gavel in for the day. lawmakers are expected to continue working a bill even with deposit insurance coverage. we could also hear more farewell speeches on the floor today from retiring senators. and now live coverage of the senate here on c-span2. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. eternal spirit, give this day to our senators hope that survives after ta
about drone attacks. he joins me live. >> it's 30,000 square feet. >> so long, hollywood. america's got a new hot spot for movies in the deep south. >> good to be with you. -iment brooke baldwin. i want to begin with a cnn exclusive. this is tough to watch, but the pictures speak volumes about what the syrian civil war is doing to its own people. this is about this teenager who defies the basic survival instinct, running away from a hail of bullets. oh, no. instead this young man who used to work in a bakery decides to crawl into the gunfire to try to save a stranger's life. this is a reality for so many syrians every single day. here's cnn, but if there children in the room, get them out now. >> a fighter slithers across the street. his body hugging the cold pavement. yards away a woman lies motionless. she has been shot by a sniper. her rescuer is not a relative nor a neighbor. he never met her. he is just 17. he knew he had to save the woman or die trying. when we met him later, he told us -- >> translator: we had a feeling she was still alive. we wanted to save her. to get her to a
know america existed? >> translator: not at all. >> did you know that the world was round? >> translator: i had no idea if it was round or square. >> camp 14 was all that he said he knew for the first 23 years of his life. these satellite images are the only glimpse outsiders have ever gotten of the place. 15 thourk people are believed to be imprisoned here, forced to live and work in this bleak collection of houses, factories, fields, and mines surrounded by an electrified fence. >> growing up, did you ever think about escaping? >> translator: that never crossed my mind. >> it never crossed your mind? >> translator: no, never. what i thought was the society outside the camp would be similar to that inside the camp. >> you thought everybody lived in a prison camp like this? >> translator: yes. >> shin told us this was the house where he was born. his mother and father were prisoners whose marriage, if you could call it that, was arranged by the guards as a reward for hard work. >> did they live together? did they see each other every day? >> translator: no. you can't live
was born there, i just thought those people who carried guns were born to carry guns. did you know, america existed? >> not at all. >> did you know, that the world was round? >> i had no idea if it was round or square. >> camp 14 was all that he knew for the first 23 years of his life. satellite images are the only glimpse that outsiders have had of the place. people live here forced to work in the collection of fac rtorie fields and mines surrounded by the electric fence. >> did you ever think of escaping? >> that never crossed my mind. >> i thought the society outside of the camp was the same as the inside. >> shin told us this is the house where he was born. his mother and father were prisoners, his marriage was arranged by the guards as a reward for hard work. >> did they live together? >> no, you can't live together. they were separated and only when they worked hard could they be together. >> did they love each other? >> i don't know. in my eyes, we were not a family. we were just prisoners. >> how do you mean? >> you wear what you are given and you eat and do what you are told to do.
,000 is not rich in america today. the question will come down to what you get into return? i like to think of it as small claims court. if everyone goes away happy, the deal is probably good. speaker boehner was probably conciliatory. now it is up to the president to come and talk about spending cuts he is willing to make. >> the american people want those now. i think that we are all just ready to say let's do something. we don't care what it is anymore. we just want resolutions. we have a good deal here. a bad deal can be really bad and we will be stuck with it for a long time. >> absolutely. if the deal is bad for america, it is not for everyone. it is bad for the world. the markets are now waiting for a decision to be made. it could be bad for the marketplace. we have to make decisions on entitlement and spending and the real cost of our economic rows. in january, we have to be talking about raising the debt ceiling. the one you said it, spending and is our problem. we have so many obligations that there is no room for error anymore. these obligations need to be part of the process. >>
, pressure for a deal intensified. jamie dimon, head of america's largest bank bias sets, jpmorgan chase, and a big wall street player, said lawmakers have to see the bigger picture. >> they know all the cards right now. you can lay them out, you can debate them all day long. everyone knows what they are. now they have got to go decide. if they go decide now, you might have a booming economy in a couple months. >> reporter: one part of the fiscal cliff drama is across-the-board government spending cuts. today every member of the house received a letter ordering them to impose 11% across the board cuts to their own budget. john boehner will meet with reporters in a couple of hours and president obama will do some interviews with stations across the country. >> also in washington is republican senator jim demint of south carolina. senator, good morning. >> good morning, charlie. >> senator, what do you think is going to happen? >> i wish i knew. most of us here are not in the loop of what they're discussing. but i do know this, that this government doesn't need more money, this country nee
that. we'll look at that for you next. plus, the changing face of america. pretty soon there will be no racial majority in our country. what will that mean for society? what about politics? that's coming up. stick around. >> gretchen: new senate bill taking on the so-called stalker apps that help smartphone user track victims. the bill was sponsored by al franken that closes a loophole that laws apps to secretly operate on a cell phone and transmit their location without their knowledge. the bill updates laws passed years before laws revolutionized smartphones. you've been working on this since the '90s. you see this as a domestic violence situation. >> it's another way to empower a stalker. they can put an application on your phone without you know and follow you wherever you are. stalking encompasses a lot of behavior, one is to know where you are all the time and send harassing emails do things physically. >> a case i was reading about, somebody was fearful of an ex-husband and he texted her saying i know you're at the courthouse and now i know you're such and such.
of these options required delivering on our promise to america's first responders. even with incentive options on course the demand for our airwaves will continue to grow. to meet this demand, efficiency is critical. at the fcc efficiency means getting all of our options done on a clear timeline. for industry efficiency means squeezing more out of the spectrum already allocated for commercial use. now is the time to invest in technologies, geographic, temporal and cognitive that multiplied the capacity of our air waves. finally for the federal government's efficiency means finding new approaches that facilitate repurchasing of the spectrum better than the old three step process of clearing, relocating and auctioning. to this end i believe it is time to develop a series of incentives to serve as catalysts for freeing more federal spectrum for commercial use. what if we were to financially reward federal authorities for efficient use of their spectrum. if we want to convert more airwaves to commercial use i believe it is time to work with our government partners so they can realize value from us
of america when he was arrested? >> he was krosting the border. >> ten feet away from america? >> or less. >> his friend was released but johnny was brought to this jail in matamoras, mexico. his parents were told the jail is largely controlled by mexican drug cartel members. a few nights after he was imprisoned his parents got a call from someone threatening to kill their son unless they paid money. >> to then he said i have your son. he said, i'm going to f him up. he said, i already have. for some stupid reason my response was oh, no. i'm going to call the consulate. and he put johnny on the phone, and i just -- i couldn't believe it. i just -- then i realized, i was like, oh, my god. i really thought he wasn't in the prison. i thought someone has taken him out of the prison. i just couldn't conceive of this going on in a government facility. >> olivia, what did johnny tell you. >> he said, mom, you need to do whatever they say. he said, they're really serious. >> they never heard tfrom the caller again, although the u.s. consulate has known about this from the beginning they kept the
flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make things you didn't even know you wanted. like a spoon fork. spray cheese. and jeans made out of sweatpants. so grab yourself some new prilosec otc wildberry. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. >>> unpaid and undocumented. an intern with a criminal past faces deportation after he is found working for a u.s. senator. >>> batter and fighting back. how a brave young woman used facebook to single out the man she says attacked her. >>> and a weighty question. hear what new jersey's chris christie has to say when barbara walters asks is he too heavy to be president? >> quite an exchange. >> welcome back to "early start." happy you're with us. i'm zoraida sambolin. >> i'm john berman. >>> we still do not know why a 22-year-old sandwich shop clerk decided to put on a hockey mask and open fire on holiday shoppers at a portland area mall but we are learning more about gunman jacob roberts and the two pe
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)